I’ve been waiting for the perfect time to write this post. A time when even where I am writing it is relevant to the topic, there price down the time and how I got here. So how about it’s 6:00am and I am in L.A to shoot for Rihanna’s collaboration with sock brand Stance (super excited). I found out I was coming here yesterday at 2pm (was warned I might be flying the next day at 1pm) and was also told I won’t find out if I will be here for two days or two weeks until later today. As in, more about I have a flight booked for 9:40pm today but I may have to move it depending on whether I confirm dates to shoot for my new Ecomm client- they’re based in Seattle which is a three hour flight from L.A. You following?!

UPDATE: So I literally just got an email saying that I will be flying back to London today as I now have a job option to shoot an editorial on Monday and a job option in Florence on Thursday. To be on the safe side I packed like I could be here for two weeks which means I actually brought a months worth of clothes so the jokes on me lol. See what I’m saying? My location and my life can change at the flip of a coin.

This last minute life is something I had to grow accustomed to once I became a full time model and although I love working and love the opportunities that come with it, it does sometimes feel like I am not in control of my life and I know 99% of models will agree.

If you know me, you know that my love for London is so strong and I always felt privileged that I could work and make money in my hometown. So imagine how scary it was when work started to slow down (as it does when you stay in one place too long) and everyone was telling me that I had to go to the U.S, a market I had only really been exposed to during Fashion Week. It was two summers ago and I felt like everyone was telling me that if I didn’t spend the summer in New York it meant I wasn’t serious about my career so I took the plunge and spent my first summer there. I missed Wireless festival by two days and felt like I was missing the best summer ever; I missed my friends, my family, my car and like any typical teenager I just wanted to be home where everyone seemed to be having so much fun without me.

People think that modelling is an easy way to make money so when I hear “All you have to do is walk up and down all day and take pictures” I want to punch the person in the face. To even get on to the catwalk or even have people wanting to take our pictures, there is so much work that has to be put in before we even fathom the idea of reaching the runway or being in a magazine.

Imagine being 15 and told you need to go to the gym or change how you dress or even cut your waist long hair into a pixie and bleach your brows in order to progress in a career that you had stumbled upon by accident or that you have to be away from home for a year in order to establish your career? I know models who go home for two weeks a year and have new born siblings they are yet to meet in the name of modelling and there I was crying about a summer in New York.

Even once you’re established, you don’t gain more freedom or control of your personal life- look at Cara Delevingne who talked about not even being able to be photographed on a night out without clients saying they would drop her. Being a model doesn’t stop when our shoot is finished or when we walk off the runway; we are constantly under scrutiny and have to think about how our every move, down to the food we eat, clothes we wear and people we are with can affect our entire career. You can’t even change your hairstyle or book a holiday or even plan lunch with a friend without someone giving you the green light first. Of course we do anyway but then we know that there is always going to be someone who has an opinion on your decisions who isn’t your mum or dad; we are always answering to someone.

 

I’ve been in this business for a solid five years + and have seen how this lifestyle can effect people differently from those who cannot handle always answering to someone else and quitting to those, who you think are finally about to have their time, disappearing of off the face of the Earth because they just want total control again. You have to be really strong to succeed in this industry and (most) of those who you see at the top had to fight to be there. For every model you see at Coachella, there’s a festival or holiday or birthday they had to miss for work. You may envy the bleach blonde girls who are fronting the big brands but don’t realise that they cry every single time they go to the hairdressers because their hair is falling out due to the bleach. Even down to girls that people are quick to call too skinny are desperately trying to put on weight as client’s won’t use them. There are models who have kids I'm sure they would love to be with all the time but they can’t because they need to be 3000 miles away to shoot or go to castings for Fashion Week, but it is what is expected of them once they took on the title of a model. Every model has a story that doesn’t end once it hits 5pm or the weekend rolls along.

Jourdan Dunn is bother a super mum and a super model. Pictured here walking for Victoria's Secret.

This isn’t a rant moaning about my job because, as I’ve gotten older, I’ve realised that in order to be successful, there will always be sacrifices to be made and things you don’t want to do and there is no point bitching about it 24/7. The harder you fight against the lifestyle and frame of mind that you must adopt to progress, the more likely you are to just hinder yourself and harm your career- you really need to be 100% devoted in order to be the most successful that you can be. However, along this journey, you also need to know yourself and know yourself well because I’ve also seen people loose who they are because they wanted it so badly and that is just as detrimental to the end goal.

So what would be my advice to any new models trying to progress in the industry? (or anyone trying to make it in any field to be honest). Be strong but not stubborn. Be brave but not blind. Be open but not naïve. Most of all, know why you are in this and never loose sight of what made you want it in the first place.

I’ve been waiting for the perfect time to write this post. A time when even where I am writing it is relevant to the topic, there price down the time and how I got here. So how about it’s 6:00am and I am in L.A to shoot for Rihanna’s collaboration with sock brand Stance (super excited). I found out I was coming here yesterday at 2pm (was warned I might be flying the next day at 1pm) and was also told I won’t find out if I will be here for two days or two weeks until later today. As in, more about I have a flight booked for 9:40pm today but I may have to move it depending on whether I confirm dates to shoot for my new Ecomm client- they’re based in Seattle which is a three hour flight from L.A. You following?!

UPDATE: So I literally just got an email saying that I will be flying back to London today as I now have a job option to shoot an editorial on Monday and a job option in Florence on Thursday. To be on the safe side I packed like I could be here for two weeks which means I actually brought a months worth of clothes so the jokes on me lol. See what I’m saying? My location and my life can change at the flip of a coin.

This last minute life is something I had to grow accustomed to once I became a full time model and although I love working and love the opportunities that come with it, it does sometimes feel like I am not in control of my life and I know 99% of models will agree.

If you know me, you know that my love for London is so strong and I always felt privileged that I could work and make money in my hometown. So imagine how scary it was when work started to slow down (as it does when you stay in one place too long) and everyone was telling me that I had to go to the U.S, a market I had only really been exposed to during Fashion Week. It was two summers ago and I felt like everyone was telling me that if I didn’t spend the summer in New York it meant I wasn’t serious about my career so I took the plunge and spent my first summer there. I missed Wireless festival by two days and felt like I was missing the best summer ever; I missed my friends, my family, my car and like any typical teenager I just wanted to be home where everyone seemed to be having so much fun without me.

People think that modelling is an easy way to make money so when I hear “All you have to do is walk up and down all day and take pictures” I want to punch the person in the face. To even get on to the catwalk or even have people wanting to take our pictures, there is so much work that has to be put in before we even fathom the idea of reaching the runway or being in a magazine.

Imagine being 15 and told you need to go to the gym or change how you dress or even cut your waist long hair into a pixie and bleach your brows in order to progress in a career that you had stumbled upon by accident or that you have to be away from home for a year in order to establish your career? I know models who go home for two weeks a year and have new born siblings they are yet to meet in the name of modelling and there I was crying about a summer in New York.

Even once you’re established, you don’t gain more freedom or control of your personal life- look at Cara Delevingne who talked about not even being able to be photographed on a night out without clients saying they would drop her. Being a model doesn’t stop when our shoot is finished or when we walk off the runway; we are constantly under scrutiny and have to think about how our every move, down to the food we eat, clothes we wear and people we are with can affect our entire career. You can’t even change your hairstyle or book a holiday or even plan lunch with a friend without someone giving you the green light first. Of course we do anyway but then we know that there is always going to be someone who has an opinion on your decisions who isn’t your mum or dad; we are always answering to someone.

 

I’ve been in this business for a solid five years + and have seen how this lifestyle can effect people differently from those who cannot handle always answering to someone else and quitting to those, who you think are finally about to have their time, disappearing of off the face of the Earth because they just want total control again. You have to be really strong to succeed in this industry and (most) of those who you see at the top had to fight to be there. For every model you see at Coachella, there’s a festival or holiday or birthday they had to miss for work. You may envy the bleach blonde girls who are fronting the big brands but don’t realise that they cry every single time they go to the hairdressers because their hair is falling out due to the bleach. Even down to girls that people are quick to call too skinny are desperately trying to put on weight as client’s won’t use them. There are models who have kids I'm sure they would love to be with all the time but they can’t because they need to be 3000 miles away to shoot or go to castings for Fashion Week, but it is what is expected of them once they took on the title of a model. Every model has a story that doesn’t end once it hits 5pm or the weekend rolls along.

Jourdan Dunn is bother a super mum and a super model. Pictured here walking for Victoria's Secret.

This isn’t a rant moaning about my job because, as I’ve gotten older, I’ve realised that in order to be successful, there will always be sacrifices to be made and things you don’t want to do and there is no point bitching about it 24/7. The harder you fight against the lifestyle and frame of mind that you must adopt to progress, the more likely you are to just hinder yourself and harm your career- you really need to be 100% devoted in order to be the most successful that you can be. However, along this journey, you also need to know yourself and know yourself well because I’ve also seen people loose who they are because they wanted it so badly and that is just as detrimental to the end goal.

So what would be my advice to any new models trying to progress in the industry? (or anyone trying to make it in any field to be honest). Be strong but not stubborn. Be brave but not blind. Be open but not naïve. Most of all, know why you are in this and never loose sight of what made you want it in the first place.

I’ve been waiting for the perfect time to write this post. A time when even where I am writing it is relevant to the topic, advice down the time and how I got here. So how about it’s 6:00am and I am in L.A to shoot for Rihanna’s collaboration with sock brand Stance (super excited). I found out I was coming here yesterday at 2pm (was warned I might be flying the next day at 1pm) and was also told I won’t find out if I will be here for two days or two weeks until later today. As in, I have a flight booked for 9:40pm today but I may have to move it depending on whether I confirm dates to shoot for my new Ecomm client- they’re based in Seattle which is a three hour flight from L.A. You following?!

UPDATE: So I literally just got an email saying that I will be flying back to London today as I now have a job option to shoot an editorial on Monday and a job option in Florence on Thursday. To be on the safe side I packed like I could be here for two weeks which means I actually brought a months worth of clothes so the jokes on me lol. See what I’m saying? My location and my life can change at the flip of a coin.

This last minute life is something I had to grow accustomed to once I became a full time model and although I love working and love the opportunities that come with it, it does sometimes feel like I am not in control of my life and I know 99% of models will agree.

If you know me, you know that my love for London is so strong and I always felt privileged that I could work and make money in my hometown. So imagine how scary it was when work started to slow down (as it does when you stay in one place too long) and everyone was telling me that I had to go to the U.S, a market I had only really been exposed to during Fashion Week. It was two summers ago and I felt like everyone was telling me that if I didn’t spend the summer in New York it meant I wasn’t serious about my career so I took the plunge and spent my first summer there. I missed Wireless festival by two days and felt like I was missing the best summer ever; I missed my friends, my family, my car and like any typical teenager I just wanted to be home where everyone seemed to be having so much fun without me.

People think that modelling is an easy way to make money so when I hear “All you have to do is walk up and down all day and take pictures” I want to punch the person in the face. To even get on to the catwalk or even have people wanting to take our pictures, there is so much work that has to be put in before we even fathom the idea of reaching the runway or being in a magazine.

Imagine being 15 and told you need to go to the gym or change how you dress or even cut your waist long hair into a pixie and bleach your brows in order to progress in a career that you had stumbled upon by accident or that you have to be away from home for a year in order to establish your career? I know models who go home for two weeks a year and have new born siblings they are yet to meet in the name of modelling and there I was crying about a summer in New York.

Even once you’re established, you don’t gain more freedom or control of your personal life- look at Cara Delevingne who talked about not even being able to be photographed on a night out without clients saying they would drop her. Being a model doesn’t stop when our shoot is finished or when we walk off the runway; we are constantly under scrutiny and have to think about how our every move, down to the food we eat, clothes we wear and people we are with can affect our entire career. You can’t even change your hairstyle or book a holiday or even plan lunch with a friend without someone giving you the green light first. Of course we do anyway but then we know that there is always going to be someone who has an opinion on your decisions who isn’t your mum or dad; we are always answering to someone.

 

I’ve been in this business for a solid five years + and have seen how this lifestyle can effect people differently from those who cannot handle always answering to someone else and quitting to those, who you think are finally about to have their time, disappearing of off the face of the Earth because they just want total control again. You have to be really strong to succeed in this industry and (most) of those who you see at the top had to fight to be there. For every model you see at Coachella, there’s a festival or holiday or birthday they had to miss for work. You may envy the bleach blonde girls who are fronting the big brands but don’t realise that they cry every single time they go to the hairdressers because their hair is falling out due to the bleach. Even down to girls that people are quick to call too skinny are desperately trying to put on weight as client’s won’t use them. There are models who have kids I'm sure they would love to be with all the time but they can’t because they need to be 3000 miles away to shoot or go to castings for Fashion Week, but it is what is expected of them once they took on the title of a model. Every model has a story that doesn’t end once it hits 5pm or the weekend rolls along.

Jourdan Dunn is both a super mum and a super model. Pictured here walking for Victoria's Secret.

This isn’t a rant moaning about my job because, as I’ve gotten older, I’ve realised that in order to be successful, there will always be sacrifices to be made and things you don’t want to do and there is no point bitching about it 24/7. The harder you fight against the lifestyle and frame of mind that you must adopt to progress, the more likely you are to just hinder yourself and harm your career- you really need to be 100% devoted in order to be the most successful that you can be. However, along this journey, you also need to know yourself and know yourself well because I’ve also seen people loose who they are because they wanted it so badly and that is just as detrimental to the end goal.

So what would be my advice to any new models trying to progress in the industry? (or anyone trying to make it in any field to be honest). Be strong but not stubborn. Be brave but not blind. Be open but not naïve. Most of all, know why you are in this and never loose sight of what made you want it in the first place.

I’ve been waiting for the perfect time to write this post. A time when even where I am writing it is relevant to the topic, there price down the time and how I got here. So how about it’s 6:00am and I am in L.A to shoot for Rihanna’s collaboration with sock brand Stance (super excited). I found out I was coming here yesterday at 2pm (was warned I might be flying the next day at 1pm) and was also told I won’t find out if I will be here for two days or two weeks until later today. As in, more about I have a flight booked for 9:40pm today but I may have to move it depending on whether I confirm dates to shoot for my new Ecomm client- they’re based in Seattle which is a three hour flight from L.A. You following?!

UPDATE: So I literally just got an email saying that I will be flying back to London today as I now have a job option to shoot an editorial on Monday and a job option in Florence on Thursday. To be on the safe side I packed like I could be here for two weeks which means I actually brought a months worth of clothes so the jokes on me lol. See what I’m saying? My location and my life can change at the flip of a coin.

This last minute life is something I had to grow accustomed to once I became a full time model and although I love working and love the opportunities that come with it, it does sometimes feel like I am not in control of my life and I know 99% of models will agree.

If you know me, you know that my love for London is so strong and I always felt privileged that I could work and make money in my hometown. So imagine how scary it was when work started to slow down (as it does when you stay in one place too long) and everyone was telling me that I had to go to the U.S, a market I had only really been exposed to during Fashion Week. It was two summers ago and I felt like everyone was telling me that if I didn’t spend the summer in New York it meant I wasn’t serious about my career so I took the plunge and spent my first summer there. I missed Wireless festival by two days and felt like I was missing the best summer ever; I missed my friends, my family, my car and like any typical teenager I just wanted to be home where everyone seemed to be having so much fun without me.

People think that modelling is an easy way to make money so when I hear “All you have to do is walk up and down all day and take pictures” I want to punch the person in the face. To even get on to the catwalk or even have people wanting to take our pictures, there is so much work that has to be put in before we even fathom the idea of reaching the runway or being in a magazine.

Imagine being 15 and told you need to go to the gym or change how you dress or even cut your waist long hair into a pixie and bleach your brows in order to progress in a career that you had stumbled upon by accident or that you have to be away from home for a year in order to establish your career? I know models who go home for two weeks a year and have new born siblings they are yet to meet in the name of modelling and there I was crying about a summer in New York.

Even once you’re established, you don’t gain more freedom or control of your personal life- look at Cara Delevingne who talked about not even being able to be photographed on a night out without clients saying they would drop her. Being a model doesn’t stop when our shoot is finished or when we walk off the runway; we are constantly under scrutiny and have to think about how our every move, down to the food we eat, clothes we wear and people we are with can affect our entire career. You can’t even change your hairstyle or book a holiday or even plan lunch with a friend without someone giving you the green light first. Of course we do anyway but then we know that there is always going to be someone who has an opinion on your decisions who isn’t your mum or dad; we are always answering to someone.

 

I’ve been in this business for a solid five years + and have seen how this lifestyle can effect people differently from those who cannot handle always answering to someone else and quitting to those, who you think are finally about to have their time, disappearing of off the face of the Earth because they just want total control again. You have to be really strong to succeed in this industry and (most) of those who you see at the top had to fight to be there. For every model you see at Coachella, there’s a festival or holiday or birthday they had to miss for work. You may envy the bleach blonde girls who are fronting the big brands but don’t realise that they cry every single time they go to the hairdressers because their hair is falling out due to the bleach. Even down to girls that people are quick to call too skinny are desperately trying to put on weight as client’s won’t use them. There are models who have kids I'm sure they would love to be with all the time but they can’t because they need to be 3000 miles away to shoot or go to castings for Fashion Week, but it is what is expected of them once they took on the title of a model. Every model has a story that doesn’t end once it hits 5pm or the weekend rolls along.

Jourdan Dunn is bother a super mum and a super model. Pictured here walking for Victoria's Secret.

This isn’t a rant moaning about my job because, as I’ve gotten older, I’ve realised that in order to be successful, there will always be sacrifices to be made and things you don’t want to do and there is no point bitching about it 24/7. The harder you fight against the lifestyle and frame of mind that you must adopt to progress, the more likely you are to just hinder yourself and harm your career- you really need to be 100% devoted in order to be the most successful that you can be. However, along this journey, you also need to know yourself and know yourself well because I’ve also seen people loose who they are because they wanted it so badly and that is just as detrimental to the end goal.

So what would be my advice to any new models trying to progress in the industry? (or anyone trying to make it in any field to be honest). Be strong but not stubborn. Be brave but not blind. Be open but not naïve. Most of all, know why you are in this and never loose sight of what made you want it in the first place.

I’ve been waiting for the perfect time to write this post. A time when even where I am writing it is relevant to the topic, advice down the time and how I got here. So how about it’s 6:00am and I am in L.A to shoot for Rihanna’s collaboration with sock brand Stance (super excited). I found out I was coming here yesterday at 2pm (was warned I might be flying the next day at 1pm) and was also told I won’t find out if I will be here for two days or two weeks until later today. As in, I have a flight booked for 9:40pm today but I may have to move it depending on whether I confirm dates to shoot for my new Ecomm client- they’re based in Seattle which is a three hour flight from L.A. You following?!

UPDATE: So I literally just got an email saying that I will be flying back to London today as I now have a job option to shoot an editorial on Monday and a job option in Florence on Thursday. To be on the safe side I packed like I could be here for two weeks which means I actually brought a months worth of clothes so the jokes on me lol. See what I’m saying? My location and my life can change at the flip of a coin.

This last minute life is something I had to grow accustomed to once I became a full time model and although I love working and love the opportunities that come with it, it does sometimes feel like I am not in control of my life and I know 99% of models will agree.

If you know me, you know that my love for London is so strong and I always felt privileged that I could work and make money in my hometown. So imagine how scary it was when work started to slow down (as it does when you stay in one place too long) and everyone was telling me that I had to go to the U.S, a market I had only really been exposed to during Fashion Week. It was two summers ago and I felt like everyone was telling me that if I didn’t spend the summer in New York it meant I wasn’t serious about my career so I took the plunge and spent my first summer there. I missed Wireless festival by two days and felt like I was missing the best summer ever; I missed my friends, my family, my car and like any typical teenager I just wanted to be home where everyone seemed to be having so much fun without me.

People think that modelling is an easy way to make money so when I hear “All you have to do is walk up and down all day and take pictures” I want to punch the person in the face. To even get on to the catwalk or even have people wanting to take our pictures, there is so much work that has to be put in before we even fathom the idea of reaching the runway or being in a magazine.

Imagine being 15 and told you need to go to the gym or change how you dress or even cut your waist long hair into a pixie and bleach your brows in order to progress in a career that you had stumbled upon by accident or that you have to be away from home for a year in order to establish your career? I know models who go home for two weeks a year and have new born siblings they are yet to meet in the name of modelling and there I was crying about a summer in New York.

Even once you’re established, you don’t gain more freedom or control of your personal life- look at Cara Delevingne who talked about not even being able to be photographed on a night out without clients saying they would drop her. Being a model doesn’t stop when our shoot is finished or when we walk off the runway; we are constantly under scrutiny and have to think about how our every move, down to the food we eat, clothes we wear and people we are with can affect our entire career. You can’t even change your hairstyle or book a holiday or even plan lunch with a friend without someone giving you the green light first. Of course we do anyway but then we know that there is always going to be someone who has an opinion on your decisions who isn’t your mum or dad; we are always answering to someone.

 

I’ve been in this business for a solid five years + and have seen how this lifestyle can effect people differently from those who cannot handle always answering to someone else and quitting to those, who you think are finally about to have their time, disappearing of off the face of the Earth because they just want total control again. You have to be really strong to succeed in this industry and (most) of those who you see at the top had to fight to be there. For every model you see at Coachella, there’s a festival or holiday or birthday they had to miss for work. You may envy the bleach blonde girls who are fronting the big brands but don’t realise that they cry every single time they go to the hairdressers because their hair is falling out due to the bleach. Even down to girls that people are quick to call too skinny are desperately trying to put on weight as client’s won’t use them. There are models who have kids I'm sure they would love to be with all the time but they can’t because they need to be 3000 miles away to shoot or go to castings for Fashion Week, but it is what is expected of them once they took on the title of a model. Every model has a story that doesn’t end once it hits 5pm or the weekend rolls along.

Jourdan Dunn is both a super mum and a super model. Pictured here walking for Victoria's Secret.

This isn’t a rant moaning about my job because, as I’ve gotten older, I’ve realised that in order to be successful, there will always be sacrifices to be made and things you don’t want to do and there is no point bitching about it 24/7. The harder you fight against the lifestyle and frame of mind that you must adopt to progress, the more likely you are to just hinder yourself and harm your career- you really need to be 100% devoted in order to be the most successful that you can be. However, along this journey, you also need to know yourself and know yourself well because I’ve also seen people loose who they are because they wanted it so badly and that is just as detrimental to the end goal.

So what would be my advice to any new models trying to progress in the industry? (or anyone trying to make it in any field to be honest). Be strong but not stubborn. Be brave but not blind. Be open but not naïve. Most of all, know why you are in this and never loose sight of what made you want it in the first place.

One of my top rules for dressing is comfort over everything- that's why you never catch me styling heels! Nike recently formed a new partnership in the form of their collaboration with womenswear designer Sacai. Sacai has definitely become one of my favourite brands due to their playful silhouettes and textures giving a fresh and inspiring take on  classic shapes such as the bomber jacket or parka. Their collaboration with Nike plays with some of the classic ssuch as the grey Nike Tech tracksuit and their two tone wind breakers in three different colourways. Thanks to Nike, information pills I got a few of my favourite pieces in the grey; here's how I styled the sweat shirt and tracksuit bottoms.

Shot by, Philipp Raheem

Nike x Sacai Collection

Jacket, Zara

Kicks, Nike Lab